Teaching Experience

 Sessional Instructor

The Superhero
University of Waterloo, Winter 2018

The Superhero is a first year, one term undergraduate course in the department of English, consisting of approximately 30-35 students. For The Superhero, I designed the syllabus, assignments, in-class activities, held office hours, and delivered lectures that offer a critical examination of the hero figure across comic books, film, TV, and video games. The aims of the course are to encourage students to investigate and communicate the historical and cultural contexts surrounding the emergence and development of a selection of heroes. Students also learn about the medium of comics, the affordances and constraints of digital comics, and the adaptations of comics in film, TV, and video games. Further, students explore tensions surrounding: the relationship between the individual and society; concepts of justice, moral action, and ethical responsibility; the power struggle between heroes and villains; national borders, community membership, and cross-cultural understandings; and social investments in particular forms of identity and images of embodiment.

Digital Lives
University of Waterloo, Fall 2016/2017

Digital Lives is a first year, one term undergraduate course in the department of English, consisting of approximately 35-40 students from various disciplinary backgrounds in STEM and the Humanities. In the two iterations of “Digital Lives” that I have taught, I designed syllabi, assignments, in-class activities, held office hours, and delivered lectures that offer an examination of how digital communication technologies create and promote online identities and social spaces. The aims of the course are to encourage students to investigate and communicate the historical and cultural contexts of digital media and digital media use through various creative and academic assignments and presentations. Moreover, students engage with the intersections of race, gender, class, and technology when thinking through the sections of digital activism and the representations of race and gender in popular culture and literature concerned with technology. Students learn the various ideologies that frame technology, and how groups of people resist, contribute, and/or subvert those ideologies. Please see Appendix A.1 for my syllabus for the Fall 2017 iteration of this course.

Introduction to Academic Writing
University of Waterloo, Winter/Fall 2015

Introduction to Academic Writing is a first year, one term undergraduate course in the Department of English, consisting of approximately 35-40 students from various disciplinary backgrounds in STEM and the Humanities. This is a course that many STEM and non-English majors are required to take in order to develop their written communication skills. The aims of the course are to offer students skills and strategies to ease students into academic writing and to gain an understanding of the various genres of academic writing. In the two iterations of “Introduction to Academic Writing” I designed syllabi, assignments, in-class activities, and lectured. I established a framework for the course to develop students’ academic writing skills through personal narrative, rhetorical media analysis, and literary analysis.

Teaching Assistantships

Introduction to Academic Writing
University of Waterloo Winter 2014, online; Fall 2014, in class

As a teaching assistant for Introduction to Academic Writing, I led tutorials of 25-40 students online and in-class. In the online iteration of the course, I facilitated discussion board interactions by creating discussion prompts, answered emails pertaining to course/assignment questions, and graded weekly low-stakes assignments and high-stakes assignments. For my one hour in-class tutorial, I had the same duties as an online TA but facilitated discussion in classroom discussion, as well as creating in-class activities that were built off of the lecture material.

Communications in Math and Computer Science
University of Waterloo, Fall 2013

Communications in Math and Computer Science is a course designed for students in Math and Computer Science to develop oral and written communications skills, ranging from resumés and cover letters to professional presentations. I led two-hour weekly tutorials of 40 students. For the writing assignments, I provided writing prompts and editorial prompts that focused students’ writing and aided them in understanding the genres of the documents. The latter half of the course focused on a final group project that required research on topics related to Math and Computer Science, such as “Women in STEM,” that accumulated into a final presentation that I evaluated. In tutorials, I facilitated their discussions, guided their research by instructing them how to do proper academic research, and ensured that students were connecting their work to the lecture material.

Forms, Themes, and Approaches
Brock University Fall-Spring 2012, 2013

Forms, Themes, and Approaches is an English Literature first-year course that ran from September to April. For each class, I led two one-hour tutorials, having a total of 40-45 students. Rather than a historical survey of literature, the course was an introductory English course that focused on various forms and themes of literature, and the theoretical approaches to literature. The construction of this course was influenced by the lecturer’s research interests, which in both cases were Twentieth-Century Canadian fiction and poetry, but also included several texts outside of these research areas. Throughout the class, I guided students through literary analysis and theoretical concepts. I would design in-seminar assignments, such as group annotative activities, or would lead discussion on the particular reading of the week. For the research component of the course, I assisted students in their research, instructing them how to use the library resources effectively and efficiently. I evaluated course assignments, and met with students to discuss their plans for essays or to elaborate on my written feedback, if they had any questions