Teaching Experience

 Sessional Instructor

The Superhero
University of Waterloo, Winter 2018

The Superhero is a first year, one term undergraduate course in the department of English, consisting of approximately 30-35 students. For The Superhero, I designed the syllabus, assignments, in-class activities, held office hours, and delivered lectures that offer a critical examination of the hero figure across comic books, film, TV, and video games. The aims of the course are to encourage students to investigate and communicate the historical and cultural contexts surrounding the emergence and development of a selection of heroes. Students also learn about the medium of comics, the affordances and constraints of digital comics, and the adaptations of comics in film, TV, and video games. Further, students explore tensions surrounding: the relationship between the individual and society; concepts of justice, moral action, and ethical responsibility; the power struggle between heroes and villains; national borders, community membership, and cross-cultural understandings; and social investments in particular forms of identity and images of embodiment.

Digital Lives
University of Waterloo, Fall 2016/2017/2018

Digital Lives is a first year, one term undergraduate course in the department of English, consisting of approximately 35-40 students from various disciplinary backgrounds in STEM and the Humanities. In the two iterations of “Digital Lives” that I have taught, I designed syllabi, assignments, in-class activities, held office hours, and delivered lectures that offer an examination of how digital communication technologies create and promote online identities and social spaces. The aims of the course are to encourage students to investigate and communicate the historical and cultural contexts of digital media and digital media use through various creative and academic assignments and presentations. Moreover, students engage with the intersections of race, gender, class, and technology when thinking through the sections of digital activism and the representations of race and gender in popular culture and literature concerned with technology. Students learn the various ideologies that frame technology, and how groups of people resist, contribute, and/or subvert those ideologies. Please see Appendix A.1 for my syllabus for the Fall 2017 iteration of this course.

Introduction to Academic Writing
University of Waterloo, Winter/Fall 2015, Fall 2018

Introduction to Academic Writing is a first year, one term undergraduate course in the Department of English, consisting of approximately 35-40 students from various disciplinary backgrounds in STEM and the Humanities. This is a course that many STEM and non-English majors are required to take in order to develop their written communication skills. The aims of the course are to offer students skills and strategies to ease students into academic writing and to gain an understanding of the various genres of academic writing. In the two iterations of “Introduction to Academic Writing” I designed syllabi, assignments, in-class activities, and lectured. I established a framework for the course to develop students’ academic writing skills through personal narrative, rhetorical media analysis, and literary analysis.